The Customer Engagement Recap – April 4

By Brandon Carter | Updated on Apr 4, 2014 4:30:00 AM

Finish off this week of ill-fated yet well-intentioned April Fools pranks with the most important news (and news you may have missed) from the customer engagement and loyalty marketing world.

In this week's customer engagement recap:

  • Joke products dominate brands' April Fools’ pranks
  • Dealers say GM customer anxiety rising, sales may take hit
  • Cereal aisle psychology: All eyes on the consumer
  • 3 Characteristics of Companies Built for Customer ROI
  • Airlines Push Subscription Programs as the Next Phase in Loyalty
  • Joke products dominate brands' April Fools’ pranks (PR Daily)

These are pretty good overall, but the best and finest prank was pulled by NPR. Sheer genius.

 

  • Dealers say GM customer anxiety rising, sales may take hit (Reuters)

Just one day after we included them in the recap for their customer service efforts, GM was hit with another recall - bringing their total to over 4.8 million vehicles recalls in 2014 alone. It's inevitable that it would impact customer confidence, and it's the local level (dealerships) that's beginning to feel the pain.

 

  • Cereal aisle psychology: All eyes on the consumer (USA Today)

In news that doesn't involve angry mobs of consumers (but perhaps does include crying, disappointed five-year olds), science has uncovered evidence that people tend to buy cereals based on the box - specifically, we like the goofy cartoon characters to make eye contact with us.

In a two-part study, researchers confirmed that the cereals targeting children are placed about 23 inches off the ground and those aimed at adults 48 inches high. After studying 65 cereals and 86 "spokes-characters" they found the cereals on the top shelves have characters staring straight ahead or slightly up to make eye contact with adults. For the lower boxes with cartoon characters with large inviting eyes, the gaze is focused slightly downward, to create eye contact with children.

 

Businesses are well acquainted with targeting and measuring their own ROI; now we must get comfortable with the fact that consumers are also constantly looking at what they get out of a dollar spent.

 

  • Airlines Push Subscription Programs as the Next Phase in Loyalty (Skift)

As we've mentioned in our recaps before, airline customers don't have much love for airlines, but a trend is emerging in which loyalty programs are placed aside in favor of subscription models. In those models, fliers pay dues for access to extra leg room, additional checked bags, and so on. The thinking is, once fliers have paid their dues, they won't pay more to fly with someone else.

  2016 loyalty stats

Topics: Customer Engagement, Points and Miles Programs, Customer Incentives, Member Benefits, Viewpoints, Weekly Recaps, FFP, loyalty programs, customer loyalty

Written by: Brandon Carter

Brandon is a writer and marketer for Access Development. He's a frequent blogger on customer and employee engagement & loyalty, consumer trends, and branding.

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