Posted by Brandon Carter on Nov 28, 2017 6:02:00 AM

(New: Only want the latest data? Check out our collection of 2017 loyalty stats.)

Customer brand loyalty is a rich and complex subject to grasp. 

What is it? (Here's a definition.)

How is it earned?

Is it worth the effort?

For your convenience, we've compiled dozens of statistics to help light the way - from how many people are active in loyalty programs to what they're looking to get out of them and how they'd like to be communicated with.

We've tried to make this list as relevant as possible, which means we combed through recent research with a focus on the US (with the occasional global stat thrown in).

These stats are culled from a variety of sources, and we've provided source links for each of them (though some are gateway pages that require you to register or submit your information to receive the actual research).

Sometimes the data conflict with other sources - we'll leave it up to you to decipher which is most accurate.

We'll keep this list updated on a weekly basis with the latest and greatest. If you know of a stat we're missing, or want your own research included in our collection, leave us a note in the comments.

Posted by Brandon Carter on Nov 15, 2017 5:00:00 AM

For many, coupons have strange connotations. They're something moms cut out, or they're only used by poor folks or the elderly.

In reality, the opposites of these are true - coupons are incredibly popular among affluent folks and millennials (not to mention every other demographic), and they don't even have to be printed out anymore, so keep your scissors in the junk drawer.

As these statistics reveal, the coupon is still a driving force in commerce that connects people (and their wallets) to brands.

People will never tire of saving money, and brands are always looking to bring in new customers. Mix in a decade-long struggling economy, and you have a savings-savvy mindset that isn't going away anytime soon.

discount programs ebook

You’ve probably heard all the same talk I did.

“Robots and AI are the future!”

“Automation and personalization are the next great wave of customer engagement!”

A robot that’s going to handle customer requests? An automated system that’s going to craft personal messages delivered through the right medium at just the right time?

How stinking cool is that?! Sign me up.

Everyone wants to get in on Millennials and their precious dollars, but how? How do you connect with a group that knows marketing when they see it and shies away from (most of) it? What can be done now to create lifetime loyalty?

To help provide some perspective, we've compiled a gathering of statistics on Gen Y loyalty and brand preferences.

We've focused on US-based research from the past 2-3 years, though there are exceptions. We'll add more as data becomes available, and feel free to tip us off to anything we've missed.

Here's what we know for sure now:

  1. They're heavily influenced by their peers and online networks
  2. The criteria they evaluate brands with is different from other generations, and leans heavily toward price and corporate social responsibility behavior
  3. They expect brands to be open to their voices and exhibit a willingness to change.

 

As engagement, loyalty, and customer success pros, we have a lot of tools to work with. Loyalty programs, incentives, gifts, rewards, content, data, and communication channels like email.

All those tools capture a little bit of real estate in the customer’s mind. They get people to take action, tugging them a bit closer to the brand (and hopefully the next purchase).

We've got all kinds of toys to pursue customer loyalty. 

And yet, we're nearly powerless to influence perhaps what matters most to customers in the long run.

Every customer is a member.

At least, that's an argument I've tried to make a couple times here. To me, "customer" implies someone that completed a transaction, while "member" signifies relationship, belonging on an ongoing basis.

Even if your business model is not subscription- or membership-based, you can benefit from that member mindset.

A key function of having members instead of customers? Engagement.

What's that?

Keeping their attention, and hitting them with the right value and the right touchpoints at the right time.

Keep people engaged, and renewal - or just the next transaction - will take care of itself.

Easier said than done, right?