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Posted by Brandon Carter on Dec 6, 2016 9:15:00 AM

Consumers carry big sticks these days.

Just ask anyone who's ever been tasked with online brand management. Nothing can bring a large corporate empire to its knees faster than an angry Tweeter with a couple thousand followers.

That consumer power is never more on display that this time of year. Most people are spending a lot right now, due to holidays and other year-end expenses.

Brands know that.

And consumers know that brands know that.

Which means they're content to wait for prices to tumble down. Most brands in turn have no option but to capitulate.

From a brand perspective, it's frustrating.

But have you considered it from the consumers point of view?

As it turns out, it's more than just practical to save money. A closer view shows biological reactions to finding a good deal - the same reactions we experience when our team wins a game or we connect with a good friend.

Conversely, saving money fights off some nasty reactions caused by financial-related stress as well. 

Posted by Brandon Carter on Jul 22, 2014 12:01:00 AM

Let’s play “The Stereotype Game!”

Q1: Of the following choices, which is the best way to appeal to Millennials?

A) Free Cats and Gourmet Meals (each only for Instagram photos, not for actual consumption)

B) Unlimited Pop Tarts

C) Endless Streaming Game of Thrones Episodes with Handy “Witty Things to Tweet” suggestion box

D) Coupons

Q2: Of the following choices, which is the best way to appeal to affluent crowds?

A) Caviar Fountains

B) Free “How to Swim Through Deep Reservoirs of Gold Coins” Lessons from an S. McDuck

C) A Complimentary Chauffeur for their Chauffeur’s Chauffeur

D) Coupons

Q3: Who are the most avid coupon users?

A) The Poor

B) Seniors

C) Millennials

D) The Affluent

E) Both C & D

Wow, those are some serious stereotypes. And while it would be awesome to have an unlimited flow of pop tarts and someone to drive around your driver’s driver, those are probably not reasonable for a business to offer people of those respective generations.

In truth, the correct answer to both Q1 and Q2 is the correct answer to Q3. Millennials and the affluent are the most voracious coupon-using demographics in the marketplace today.

Posted by Dave Bona on Mar 3, 2014 2:45:00 AM

We've made the claim that coupons can work for just about any business, as long as the deals are created with specific goals and audiences in mind. Mom-and-pop shops, regional chains, national retailers and yes, high-end brands.

That's right, even high-end brands can - and do - use deals to entice the right crowd to shop at their establishments. In fact, Access has helped many of these brands craft offers, but more on that in a moment.

Here's one thing many people don't realize: rich people love coupons. Households making over $100,000 are twice as likely to use coupons as those earning under $35,000. College graduates are also twice as likely to use coupons as those who did not graduate from high school. In fact, studies show that the less a household earns, the less likely they are to use coupons.

More than any other brands in the universe, high-end brands are very specific (even secretive) about their offers, but they're just like any other business in the world in this: they still need people to walk in the door and make purchases.

Here are three simple lessons Access has learned from high-end brands in our efforts to craft offers that drive the specific results they were looking for:

Posted by Dave Bona on Feb 4, 2014 10:24:00 PM

Access Vice President of Partnership Marketing Dave Bona oversees the development and maintenance of the nation’s largest private discount network, featuring over 300,000 merchants. We asked Dave to chime in with his thoughts on coupons and how the practice is changing for merchants. Be sure to catch parts one, two, and three in the series.

Posted by Dave Bona on Jan 29, 2014 12:03:00 AM

Access Vice President of Partnership Marketing Dave Bona oversees the development and maintenance of the nation’s largest private discount network, featuring over 300,000 merchants. We asked Dave to chime in with his thoughts on coupons and how the practice is changing for merchants. Be sure to catch parts one and two in the series.

If you've been paying attention, you know that couponing, when done wisely, is still one of the best methods to draw a crowd to your business. But I also warned that a sloppy, unprepared approach can sink a business. So what does all this mean to you, person running a small business and considering a coupon campaign?

First, it means running a coupon campaign is smart as long as you maintain a strategic focus on long-term profitability. Second, it means you have some options.

Consider these six essential factors before you greenlight that deal: