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I’m a self-proclaimed Potterhead (a nickname given to fanatics of the Harry Potter series).

Needless to say, one of my favorite trips as an adult (yes I said adult) was a quick, two day visit to Universal Studios Orlando to finally experience the Wizarding World of Harry Potter.

And it was...

AWESOME!

I got to see Gringotts Bank, eat at the Leaky Cauldron, enjoy a frozen butterbeer, go inside Ollivanders wand shop, ride on the Hogwarts Express and more.

My point? Traveling is an important part of peoples’ lives as it creates opportunities for discovery, exploration, shared experiences and lasting memories.

Which brings me to the idea that people love to travel (no surprise there) - all kinds of people in all kinds of ways for all kinds of reasons.

How much do people love to travel you ask?

So much so that we've created an entire stats page around it, Travel and Tourism Statistics: The Ultimate Collection, to help us better understand travelers.

Americans alone took 2.3 billion solo trips for business and leisure purposes in 2017.

Not only do people like to travel, but they spend a significant amount of their hard earned dollars on road trips, vacations, getaways, staycations, etc.

Direct spending by resident and international travelers in the U.S. averaged $2.8 billion a day, $118.2 million an hour, $2.0 million a minute and $32,800 a second in 2017.

Because traveling is such a significant part of people’s lives, we've identified 6 things you should know about travel savings as they relate to your members.

Membership groups are trying to adapt to the increasing demands of members who want personally relevant value from the organizations they join. Here’s why organizations are embracing membership discount platforms to drive ongoing engagement.

About a 4 minute read

You might call me a Millennial. I was born right there on the border of what’s considered a Millennial and a Gen Xer. I can sympathize with both, including the quirks from both.

What does that mean? For one thing, it means I’ll smother mayo on my sandwich while saying “hey Siri, why do people say Millennials are killing mayo?”

But mostly, it means I can understand why “kids these days” behave so differently than the generations before. It’s no wonder they’re perceived as “killing” so many of the things that used to define what it meant to be an adult. They want totally different things, especially when it comes to the relationships they hold with the businesses they frequent. 

Have you ever asked yourself what creates loyalty?

We have.

In fact, we’ve filled several pages devoted to gathering the latest facts and stats about all things customer loyalty and engagement.

What is it? How do you earn it? Is it worth the effort? (And so on...)

On the flip side, have you ever wondered what makes loyalty fade?

We’ve asked ourselves that one, too, turning again to our content-filled stats pages to seek out some answers.

Read on and discover -- like we did -- five clear patterns that studies suggest are fast and easy ways to turn off consumers and drive them away from becoming truly loyal.

Love at first sight can happen.

Just ask Hollywood.

Or if you want scientific proof, this study shows it takes about 1/5 of a second for the brain to make all the numerous judgments it takes to fall in love.

And for even more evidence, ask my husband. He loves to remind me just how quickly he fell in love with me, especially on a certain holiday in February... or when he's in trouble.

But it’s definitely rare. Not just for love between two individuals, but also between individuals and the businesses they frequent.

Posted by Brandon Carter on Feb 6, 2019 12:28:00 PM

A customer is someone who buys something. A member is someone who belongs to something.

We should all aim to have members, even if we don't have a formal membership structure. Members, in this sense, are customers who have developed a deeper, ongoing relationship with your product or brand.

These relationships don’t happen by accident. Some brands can develop deep cult followings, but not all of us can be Apple or Starbucks.

We can however, borrow specific tactics from membership groups designed to build engagement and long-term loyalty.

Start small. Try any of these 20 engagement tactics used by some of the largest membership organizations in the world.