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You’ve probably heard it called customer success – after all, that’s what it’s known by in most of the business world.

Here at Access, we call it client success and we have an entire department dedicated to it.

Or you could call it member success. While not a buzz word, this would be just as relevant a term.

What am I talking about?

All these describe the idea that companies should strategize their business plan with the end user in mind. And little by little, it has taken over the business world mindset and become the preferred way to gain an audience’s loyalty – and all the benefits that come with it.

Some businesses seem to have it made. They have a faithful following that only seems to grow year after year.

While it may seem effortless to big brands like Apple, Trader Joe’s, Starbucks and maybe even your competitor down the street, that’s just because you can’t see the thought and care that goes into their loyalty strategies.

In fact, you can build your own wildly successful loyalty program by hitting the right notes for your organization and members. Hint: “right” could mean something very different for you than it does for other successful businesses.

There are a lot of reasons an association might want to build a new member benefits platform. Some are attempting a formal loyalty strategy for the first time. Some may not be seeing the results they want and are beginning to rethink their solutions.

When planning for college, I believed journalism was the best (maybe only) choice I had to earn an actual money-making career based on writing. Even though I knew early on I was unhappy in that major, I stuck through my classes.

And worked at the school newspaper.

And practiced my “interview skills” on unsuspecting blind dates.

Basically, I pounded away at the goal for three years before taking a step back to figure out why things weren’t falling into place like they should. It took opening up my mind to realize that my basic premise was wrong before I could make the change. I’m much happier now, thanks for asking.

When we make choices based on wrong assumptions, our results won’t be satisfactory no matter how good our intentions.

Not all member discount programs can really attract and engage your constituents like they promise. Here are 20 of the most important elements to look for in an effective (and compelling) discount program.

About a 4 minute read

 

Why are more and more member-based organizations, employers, associations offering their constituents a private discount program as part of their benefits?

Because if it’s done right, offering compelling consumer discounts has almost universal appeal with virtually any demographic,  young or old, male or female. 

Membership groups are trying to adapt to the increasing demands of members who want personally relevant value from the organizations they join. Here’s why organizations are embracing membership discount platforms to drive ongoing engagement.

About a 4 minute read

You might call me a Millennial. I was born right there on the border of what’s considered a Millennial and a Gen Xer. I can sympathize with both, including the quirks from both.

What does that mean? For one thing, it means I’ll smother mayo on my sandwich while saying “hey Siri, why do people say Millennials are killing mayo?”

But mostly, it means I can understand why “kids these days” behave so differently than the generations before. It’s no wonder they’re perceived as “killing” so many of the things that used to define what it meant to be an adult. They want totally different things, especially when it comes to the relationships they hold with the businesses they frequent.