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Posted by Dave Bona on Sep 18, 2014 1:28:00 AM

As the purveyors of the nation’s largest private discount program, we’re frequently asked why so many merchants participate in our network. It’s a fair question, and there are many answers. If I had to peg it down to one reason, bringing our merchant partners incremental business (or customers they wouldn’t get on their own) is one of the primary drivers of participation and it also fuels the overall offer value.

Another key point: if you notice, when we refer to the network we often include the word “private,” which as we’ve pointed out, is one of the hallmarks of an effective discount program. Clients and prospective clients obviously can access our content any time, as well as our members. The general public, however, is kept out. (You're welcome to contact us anytime if you're interested in learning about who's in our network)

Posted by Dave Bona on Mar 3, 2014 2:45:00 AM

We've made the claim that coupons can work for just about any business, as long as the deals are created with specific goals and audiences in mind. Mom-and-pop shops, regional chains, national retailers and yes, high-end brands.

That's right, even high-end brands can - and do - use deals to entice the right crowd to shop at their establishments. In fact, Access has helped many of these brands craft offers, but more on that in a moment.

Here's one thing many people don't realize: rich people love coupons. Households making over $100,000 are twice as likely to use coupons as those earning under $35,000. College graduates are also twice as likely to use coupons as those who did not graduate from high school. In fact, studies show that the less a household earns, the less likely they are to use coupons.

More than any other brands in the universe, high-end brands are very specific (even secretive) about their offers, but they're just like any other business in the world in this: they still need people to walk in the door and make purchases.

Here are three simple lessons Access has learned from high-end brands in our efforts to craft offers that drive the specific results they were looking for:

Posted by Dave Bona on Feb 4, 2014 10:24:00 PM

Access Vice President of Partnership Marketing Dave Bona oversees the development and maintenance of the nation’s largest private discount network, featuring over 300,000 merchants. We asked Dave to chime in with his thoughts on coupons and how the practice is changing for merchants. Be sure to catch parts one, two, and three in the series.

Posted by Dave Bona on Jan 29, 2014 12:03:00 AM

Access Vice President of Partnership Marketing Dave Bona oversees the development and maintenance of the nation’s largest private discount network, featuring over 300,000 merchants. We asked Dave to chime in with his thoughts on coupons and how the practice is changing for merchants. Be sure to catch parts one and two in the series.

If you've been paying attention, you know that couponing, when done wisely, is still one of the best methods to draw a crowd to your business. But I also warned that a sloppy, unprepared approach can sink a business. So what does all this mean to you, person running a small business and considering a coupon campaign?

First, it means running a coupon campaign is smart as long as you maintain a strategic focus on long-term profitability. Second, it means you have some options.

Consider these six essential factors before you greenlight that deal:

Posted by Brandon Carter on Sep 16, 2013 8:25:00 AM

 

Cookies from The Chocolate, a dessert cafe in Utah.

Running a business is tough. If it’s a brick-and-mortar, consumer-facing business, then it’s doubly tough. You have staff to manage and train, facilities to maintain, codes to abide by, books to keep, bills to pay and oh, somewhere in there you need to have a great product or service.

On top of all those things, you need to actually bring people in the doors to pay for it all.

Knowing this, merchant funded rewards and coupon marketers across the country have focused their attention on merchants. They understand that many businesses are desperate to do whatever is necessary to bring in traffic and keep the doors open for another week. They prey on these restaurants, retailers, health spas and service shops for deals, promising to bring in traffic in exchange for a cut of the revenue.

Some are legit, many aren’t. With so many other duties to handle, most business owners can’t take the time to vet every opportunity. It’s a recipe for disaster in many instances.