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Posted by Ashley Autry on Apr 11, 2019 8:37:17 AM

We talk about customer loyalty a lot here on the Access blog. Not surprising, given that this is indeed a "loyalty blog."
 
When it comes to the topic of customer loyalty, however, we like to draw as much and as often as possible from what's happening in the real world. Using real data. In the pursuit of real results.
 
And while some principles around customer loyalty tend to remain the same, it's always the data that helps us distinguish between the truth and what is merely "conventional wisdom."
 
That's why every year we lend our loyalty community a helping hand by gathering every relevant bit of customer engagement and loyalty data we can find. Since new data emerges all the time throughout the year, we update these statistics at least monthly, if not more often, so be sure to bookmark or subscribe to our email.
 
Note: the stats below and others from recent years can be found as always on our Ultimate Collection of Loyalty Statistics . As we've done in years past, we'll continue to provide a link back to the original source of the data for your convenience. And if you have relevant information you'd like us to include, don't hesitate to drop it in the comments.
 
Enjoy!
 

When planning for college, I believed journalism was the best (maybe only) choice I had to earn an actual money-making career based on writing. Even though I knew early on I was unhappy in that major, I stuck through my classes.

And worked at the school newspaper.

And practiced my “interview skills” on unsuspecting blind dates.

Basically, I pounded away at the goal for three years before taking a step back to figure out why things weren’t falling into place like they should. It took opening up my mind to realize that my basic premise was wrong before I could make the change. I’m much happier now, thanks for asking.

When we make choices based on wrong assumptions, our results won’t be satisfactory no matter how good our intentions.

Not all member discount programs can really attract and engage your constituents like they promise. Here are 20 of the most important elements to look for in an effective (and compelling) discount program.

About a 4 minute read

 

Why are more and more member-based organizations, employers, associations offering their constituents a private discount program as part of their benefits?

Because if it’s done right, offering compelling consumer discounts has almost universal appeal with virtually any demographic,  young or old, male or female. 

Membership groups are trying to adapt to the increasing demands of members who want personally relevant value from the organizations they join. Here’s why organizations are embracing membership discount platforms to drive ongoing engagement.

About a 4 minute read

You might call me a Millennial. I was born right there on the border of what’s considered a Millennial and a Gen Xer. I can sympathize with both, including the quirks from both.

What does that mean? For one thing, it means I’ll smother mayo on my sandwich while saying “hey Siri, why do people say Millennials are killing mayo?”

But mostly, it means I can understand why “kids these days” behave so differently than the generations before. It’s no wonder they’re perceived as “killing” so many of the things that used to define what it meant to be an adult. They want totally different things, especially when it comes to the relationships they hold with the businesses they frequent. 

Love at first sight can happen.

Just ask Hollywood.

Or if you want scientific proof, this study shows it takes about 1/5 of a second for the brain to make all the numerous judgments it takes to fall in love.

And for even more evidence, ask my husband. He loves to remind me just how quickly he fell in love with me, especially on a certain holiday in February... or when he's in trouble.

But it’s definitely rare. Not just for love between two individuals, but also between individuals and the businesses they frequent.