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Posted by Andrew Graft on May 21, 2018 1:51:16 PM

Those of us here at Access like to think of our little corner of the world as the happiest place on earth.

Singing, dancing, group hugs...you know, the kind of behavior you'd expect from the people at America's largest discount network

(New: Only want the latest data? Check out our collection of 2017 loyalty stats.)

Customer brand loyalty is a rich and complex subject to grasp. 

What is it? (Here's a definition.)

How is it earned?

Is it worth the effort?

For your convenience, we've compiled dozens of statistics to help light the way - from how many people are active in loyalty programs to what they're looking to get out of them and how they'd like to be communicated with.

We've tried to make this list as relevant as possible, which means we combed through recent research with a focus on the US (with the occasional global stat thrown in).

These stats are culled from a variety of sources, and we've provided source links for each of them (though some are gateway pages that require you to register or submit your information to receive the actual research).

Sometimes the data conflict with other sources - we'll leave it up to you to decipher which is most accurate.

We'll keep this list updated on a weekly basis with the latest and greatest. If you know of a stat we're missing, or want your own research included in our collection, leave us a note in the comments.

Posted by Brandon Carter on Feb 20, 2018 9:44:00 AM

 

We spend a lot of time talking about customer loyalty here. It’s part of this blog’s title, after all. We’re very interested in the mechanics that lead a customer to enter into a relationship, of sorts, with a brand.

And like any great relationship, that affection can’t just be a one-way street. It’s pretty safe to say that no brand has ever suffered from showing some love back to their customers.

The great thing about customer appreciation is it takes many forms. It’s giving away expensive items, but it’s also having a staff that remembers first names and frequent purchases. The bottom line is there are many ways a brand can make customers feel like it cares about them.

Here are 40 simple and inexpensive ways any brand can express appreciation for its customers:

Posted by Ashley Autry on Feb 13, 2018 8:31:00 AM

What causes customers to disengage from brands? 
 
Conversely, what causes them to fall in love with a brand and never defect?
 
Do loyalty programs matter anymore? Are people just looking for freebies, handouts, and the lowest possible price?
 
These are questions we're all seeking answers to. 
 
We're here to help, and we're bringing data with us!
 
Just as we've done over the past several years, we're compiling every relevant piece of customer engagement and loyalty data publicly released this year. We'll add new data weekly, if not more frequently, so bookmark - or subscribe to our weekly email, which will highlight the most interesting and topical stats.
 
Of course, these stats plus stats from recent years can be found on our Ultimate Collection of Loyalty Statistics .
 
As always, we'll provide a link back to the original source of the data. If you have research you'd like us to include, feel free to drop it in the comments.
 

Customer loyalty can be defined in several different ways.

Primarily, customer loyalty is when a person transacts with a brand (or purchases a specific product) on an ongoing basis.

However, loyalty can take many different shapes and forms.

Some argue that customer loyalty is when a customer only purchases from specific brands. For example, you will only buy groceries from one store, even when it isn’t convenient or the cheapest option.

Others say loyalty doesn’t always manifest itself in purchases, but in behavior such as social advocacy. A customer may only buy one Toyota in their lifetime, but they may be an outspoken advocate of the quality of Toyota vehicles to friends.

It’s up to each business to decide how it defines loyalty, whether it’s transaction size or frequency, fidelity, evangelism or just devoted engagement.

There’s a longtime adage in business that says it costs five times more (or even more) to acquire a new customer than to retain an existing one. It’s cited all over the place, but no one is quite clear on its origins. Don Peppers attributed it to a Harvard Business Review article “from a couple decades ago.” Ipsos Loyalty says it’s outright untrue.

The truth is, there are a number of cost variables every company has in play that muddy the waters between retention and acquisition. There are complicating factors on each side of the equation, but in general, it’s going to cost more to bring a customer in than to keep one in the fold.

That makes it sound so easy. Combine it with the Pareto Principle (80% of sales will come from 20% of customers) and you’ve got yourself a simple game plan for untold fortunes.

What those adages don’t mention is that customer retention is harder than acquisition.