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Posted by Kendra Lusty on Sep 19, 2019 9:39:19 AM

Last week, we discussed the importance of a great onboarding effort in the article “What is Onboarding? The Next Critical Step in Your Loyalty Program.” And now in the article below we’ll show you some techniques for making your onboarding efforts great.

As a Cub Scout leader, I recently coached a group of 8-year-old boys on how to prepare for a 1-mile hike. I asked them to name some items they would need to bring with them. And because they are 8-year-old boys, they kind of stared off into the distance as I listed the essentials like water, a first aid kit, proper footwear, etc.

Then I asked them what items they shouldn’t bring on a hike. And because they are 8-year-old boys, they talked over each other to name about a hundred ridiculous things like a piece of glass, 5 million empty bags, a spider web, and the giant stuffed lion one had won at a fair.

Posted by Kendra Lusty on Sep 10, 2019 8:26:55 AM

Congratulations! You’ve attracted yourself a new member and you’re bound to be best friends forever, right?

The reality, unfortunately, is that most members won’t stick with you beyond the first week, and even more will disappear by the end of a month. 

Those that stick around for the long haul are your loyal members and your best source of income.

But first you have to get them to stay.

New members are notoriously quick to abandon loyalty programs when they don’t see immediate value. They delete apps, leave points unredeemed, fail to continue a free trial and basically forget you exist. This happens when people don’t immediately see the value of membership.

Posted by Kendra Lusty on Jul 18, 2019 10:07:28 AM

I live in a small town and our only shoe store, Payless Shoes, recently went out of business. And while their liquidation sales were awesome – $2 per pair boys dress shoes? I bought one in every size! – now what?

Between my elementary-aged kids’ ever changing shoe sizes, and my inability to be comfortable in anything more confining than a flip flop, I never buy shoes online.

In case you missed it, Payless Shoes recently closed every store and its ecommerce operations in US and Canada “as a result of a challenging retail climate.”

If you believe the news, you’d probably say Payless is just the next chain in a long line of mega-retailers to fall victim to the dreaded retail apocalypse.

Posted by Emily Hayes on Jan 30, 2018 8:42:00 AM

For every action, there’s an equal and opposite reaction.

For instance, it was fun eating the Halloween candy you should’ve been handing out to trick-or-treaters.

But, a rumbly tummy and eggs all over your house are natural parts of the reaction.

Among those of us in Customer Success and customer loyalty, the same thing applies.

If acquiring and thrilling customers is our main action, then finding and dealing with bad customers is just as important.

It’s not fun. In fact, it stinks. Bad customers are still customers after all, and they’ve willingly agreed to give you their money.

As profitable and valuable as loyal customers are, bad customers can be equally as damaging. They're costly to service in both dollars and hours, and in the end they’re likely to damage your brand and reputation.

So someone has to deal with them.

Posted by Emily Hayes on Oct 10, 2017 8:33:00 AM

Access has always been very good at customer relationships. We wouldn’t have experienced steady, uninterrupted growth for 30+ years if we didn’t have a good product and track record with clients.

We retain about 98% of our clients annually, and have an NPS score that rivals the best companies in the world, not just our industry.

So why would we need a formal Customer Success effort?

The truth is, we want more for our clients. Sure, they’re satisfied with us, but we want them thrilled. More than that, we want their customers, members, and employees to be thrilled.

When their annual budgets come due, we want keeping their relationship with Access to be a no-brainer that everyone from the CEO on down can agree upon.

As such, we recognized the need to formalize our efforts around retention and satisfaction.

And guess who got to lead the charge? Yours truly.

Posted by Emily Hayes on Jul 11, 2017 8:21:00 AM

Sometimes change stinks.

New Coke.

When the "Most Interesting Man in the World" turned into one that was just "Sort of Interesting."

That one time a major retailer dared to change their logo.

We often can't handle change. Why can't things just work as they are right now?

Welcome to the world of an executive. To these folks at the top, life is best left to a series of small shifts and adjustments. Major change isn't often needed. The machine only needs tuning.

If you had hundreds of employees whose hopes and dreams, families, and financial stability relied on your choices, you'd be pretty cautious too.

What if you, regular employee, see an opportunity to help your company? Something that might require a bit of change?

If you're a frustrated sales rep, customer service pro, account manager, or just an employee who's concerned with customer churn, you might have an interest in Customer Success.

Customer loyalty is struggling for a reason. Being reactive to issues isn't enough but it's what most companies settle for. There must be more resources dedicated to sniffing out problems before they arise, and ensuring customers have optimal experiences.

That's Customer Success. It's a different approach, one that requires dedicated resources and investments.

One that your risk-averse superiors may be hesitant to adopt.

You're the right person to lead it. And I can help show you how.